Killah Priest conducted by Todd E. Jones  



Killah Priest: Spiritually Hardcore

May 2003



MVRemix: What is going on with The 4 Horsemen? Will there ever be an album? Will those songs ever be released?

Killah Priest: Yeah, definitely! We're gonna merge on through! Right now, I'm concentrating on the Maccabees album. Right now, we're just coming out of the studio. The Maccabees are me, Hell Razah, Daddy Rose, Salahudin, Timbo King, and my man Flame, the new member.

MVRemix: Where did you find the producers for 'Black August'?

Killah Priest: I met them out in Cali, when I was staying out in Cali for a minute. This cat, Jahson hit me off with some beats and I managed to see the natural talent. I was like 'Yo, man I got to use some of this.' Sh*t, I'm in the middle of the street now about to get hit by a car. (laughs).

MVRemix: Since you are from New York, does recording in California or on the West Coast have a different affect on the music or creative process?

Killah Priest: Nah, not really. I just went out there because I like the atmosphere. The next album, I might record it in Killah Priest interviewJamaica. I just liked the atmosphere. Plus, at the time, I had a lot of people who be coming up to me so by recording. In Cali, I had a better chance at getting away from everybody running up in your studio session. You know how that go.

MVRemix: Elephant Man is on the 'Robbery' remix. How did you hook up with him and what was that collaboration like?

Killah Priest: Danny Wyatt hooked that up. We flew out there to Jamaica and met up with Elephant Man and his sh*t was dope. He came in the studio and busted in, heard the joint and was like 'Yo, I like this!'. He just kicked a rhyme and the sh*t was dope. We recorded it and it worked out from there. Also, I did a song for his album.

MVRemix: How did the Sunz Of Man come together?

Killah Priest: Sunz Of Man was a group that I put together. We were called The Disciples. It was me and Shabazz The Disciple. Then, I met up with Hell Razah and Prodigal Sunn. One thing led to another and we put together Sunz Of Man. Then came 60 Second Assassin. That's how that happened. Sunz Of Man is based on being hardcore both lyrical and spiritual.

MVRemix: Why and how did you leave Sunz Of Man? What happened?

Killah Priest: I didn't really leave Sunz Of Man. It's just that in time, everything changes and you have to make better moves. If you don't move, you stick around the same old format. I think that some of the members in the group wanted to branch and do other things. That's what happened with them.

MVRemix: What is your relationship with them now? Were there any hard feelings?

Killah Priest: Not with all the members. I think that some of the members didn't understand fully about the business. We were all learning ourselves. At the time, I was engrossed with the business and he was telling me a lot more stuff in it. I guess Prodigal Sunn felt that he should get closer to Rza. I left it at that.

MVRemix: Religion plays a major role in your music and life. Do you subscribe to one kind? Which one?

Killah Priest: Nah, nah. I'm not a religious person. A lot of people may think that a man named Killah Priest is religious by the way I was pushed out there but I'm more of a spiritual person. Religion is a Greek word that came from a word 'Religio' that means to hold back, restrain or keep down. So, it's like an institution for the mind. If you listen to all of my songs and take it back as early as 'B.I.B.L.E.', I was never quoting religion. I was just rhyming about my life and going through that regarding spirituality.

MVRemix: What emcee/group would you like to collaborate with in the future?

Killah Priest: All of them. I think Eminem is dope. Nas is dope. I think that Dead Prez is dope. I like them too.

MVRemix: What producer would you like to collaborate with in the future?

Killah Priest: I would like to work with Dr. Dre. I would like to work with Just Blaze again.

MVRemix: On 'View From Masada', you were one of the first to bring out Just Blaze as a producer. How did you guys meet and end up collaborating?

Killah Priest: Yeah! Definitely. He's with the Roc now. I can't hate. I say 'Get your money man!' Me and Just Blaze started out like this. I was listening to his beats and I told him that he would be on top. It worked out good. He brought that cinematic viewpoint to the music on 'View From Masada'. He kind of put up the canvas and I just painted the pictures.

MVRemix: Out of your 4 albums, do you have a favorite?

Killah Priest: I would have to say 'Priesthood' because it was the first time that I truly did my own thing.

MVRemix: Many people think that 'Heavy Mental' is your best album. What is your opinion on 'Heavy Mental'?

Killah Priest: The album 'Heavy Mental' is always a classic. A lot of people like 'Heavy Mental' but that's just the beginning. That's not the end. Some people say 'Priest, why don't you do a Heavy Mental II?' That's nothing. Actually, the 'Heavy Mental' I dropped was actually the 2nd one. I lost the first one. I lost the first version. The song 'Heavy Mental', I lost it on a ferry boat going to Staten Island.

MVRemix: What was the last incident of racism you experienced?

Killah Priest: Hmm. Let me see. I don't know. Probably, the other day. I don't know, man. I stay clear of that bullsh*t. I think that people who are still caught up in that type of mentality are ready to get lost.

>>> continued...





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